Paying a Real Living Wage 97p higher than the government’s living wage, an inclusive employer featuring in Stonewall’s top 100 for LGBT+ people, and with more insourced jobs than any other Council in the UK and no compulsory redundancies, Leeds Labour Council is run to provide the highest standard of service ensured by treating its workers well. Community hubs attempt to protect vital local services in the face of government cuts. For the future Labour aims high, working to make Leeds a living wage city. And we’ll continue to press for the devolved settlement which would bring back more power from Whitehall to the people of Leeds.

“With Labour running Leeds City Council, we ensure that our city has a strong economy but with compassion and socialism at the heart of everything we do.

Back in 2015 we raised the wages of the lowest paid employees to the level of the Living Wage Foundation real living wage. We have not only kept up with this but now in 2019 we pay our lowest paid staff £9.18 an hour. This is 18p higher than the real living wage and 97p higher than the government’s living wage.
Paying this Leeds living wage was something that the Government provided no funding towards
but is essential in ensuring that people earn a fair day’s wage for a fair day’s work.

Additionally the gap between the lowest and highest paid in Leeds City Council is significantly lower than other councils and has largely been achieved by raising the wages of the lowest paid.

Looking to the future we will work to ensure that anyone doing any work on behalf of the Council can also be paid the real living wage, but also launching a living wage city campaign to work across the private and public sectors to made Leeds a living wage city.
Already the NHS in Leeds recently announced to become a real living wage employer, and along with Leeds City Council this accounts for the two largest employers in the city.
With living standards falling under the Conservatives, here in Leeds Labour in power will do everything we can to try to reverse that trend.

Under Labour, we have done our best to protect libraries and other services many people access. We have achieved much of this by introducing new community hubs to a number of areas. The hubs offer a mixture of library services, housing services, customer services and job search advice. Under Labour we will continue to roll out more of these community hubs across the city.

Leeds City Council remains the largest employer in Leeds largely due to the volume of services we have kept in-house. Under Labour Leeds City Council is proud to have more insourced jobs than any other Council in the UK, and will continue to do so.
We will continue to look to where we can bring further services in-house in future.

There have been no compulsory redundancies. This gives job security to our workers and a stability of service to our residents. We will continue to have this as a priority despite ongoing cuts from the Conservative Government.

We are also proud to be an inclusive employer with Leeds City Council featuring in Stonewall’s top 100 employers for LGBT+ people for two years running.

We were disappointed recently to see the government reject the One Yorkshire devolution plan that Council leaders across all of Yorkshire had put together. The proposal would have seen some powers given to the county by central government. It is vital that decisions that affect Yorkshire are made in Yorkshire as we know what is best for us. The appetite for devolution is there and under Labour, Leeds City Council will continue to push for more powers and more money to be devolved from Whitehall to Yorkshire.

Under Labour we aim to run Leeds City Council in a way which Leeds can be proud of. By treating workers right ensures that the work we do is of a high standard and benefits all the people of Leeds.”

On May 2 – vote to Keep Leeds Labour.
Here in Leeds NW – vote Neil Walshaw in Headingley and Hyde Park, James Gibson in Weetwood, Nigel Gill in Adel and Wharfedale, Elliot Nathan in Otley and Yeadon

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